How to Celebrate Your New Baby Without Infant Baptism

Ryan06

As a pastor, I come across parents all the time who came from a Catholic or Mainline denominational background, and face a genuine dilemma. They have the desire to commemorate the spiritual significance of their children’s birth, and often face the perceived pressure to baptize their baby. But as they have grown in their understanding of Scripture, they have become convinced that baptism is something reserved for those who are ready to express the faith they have personally placed in Jesus.

The inclination to celebrate the moment is both natural and wonderful – and there are certainly ways to celebrate a meaningful milestone without compromising your convictions. Consider these three recommendations:

1. First and foremost, stand firm on your desire to postpone baptism for later. You may receive outside pressure from family members and grandparents – or internal pressure from guilt – about forsaking longstanding tradition. But choosing to follow the truth of the Scripture will allow your child to experience the joy of baptism once he makes his own decision for Christ – and can mark that moment with the picture of being buried with Christ. In fact, many of those who feel so strongly about infant baptism are really speaking from a desire to ensure that the child is raised to worship Jesus. So when you explain your motives and reasoning to even the most traditional, many will understand and appreciate the path you are choosing.

2. Look for an opportunity to dedicate your child to the Lord in a worship service. Lots of churches celebrate a time of “Child and Family Dedication” at certain times of the year. This often entails an introduction to the congregation, and a prayer over your child by the pastor. At Bannockburn, we take this a step further by preceding the presentation with a four-week “Legacy Class.” During this time together, each parent establishes a set of core values and goals for raising the child in a strategic, intentional, and spiritual way – creating the best opportunity for success. We use the Raising Wallbreakers curriculum I published this year and developed specifically for this group of parents several years ago. You can pick up a copy for yourself – or your church leader – at FaithBreakthroughs.com.

3. Use a symbol to commemorate the moment. Consider purchasing a special Bible to share with your child when she gets old enough to understand – reminding her that you set aside a special time to dedicate your parenting to Jesus. Let her know that you have made a commitment before God and other people to raise her in a way that gives her the greatest opportunity to be fulfilled – not to mention pointing her to a relationship with Jesus Christ.

4. Celebrate the decision with others! Throughout the Bible, celebrations, feasts, and ceremonies were used to mark special occasions. When you have made the choice to honor God with intentional parenting, this is a significant step that should be shared. At the very least, you want to invite all of your close friends and family on the day you celebrate Child and Family Dedication at your church. Beyond that, throw a party, have a dinner, or at least come together afterwards for conversation and prayer.

Baptism is a once-in-a-lifetime expression of the salvation Jesus offers when an individual trusts Him for forgiveness and new life. As much as you want to commemorate your new family, don’t confuse the meaning of this God-given picture by baptizing your baby. There are wonderful ways to make the same impact and commitment to your high calling as a mom or dad that will be just as meaningful, and will prepare your child for the privilege of enjoying all that baptism was meant to be in the days ahead.

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The spiritual barriers people face are countless, but they can be categorized into Eight Primary Walls. These walls correlate with the 8 primary breakthroughs that everyone needs.
1 of 48
I am confident God has forgiven me for my past.
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I think that God will meet all my needs.
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When looking back on my life, I tend to focus on all of the things I did wrong.
4 of 48
I feel compelled to make the world around me better.
5 of 48
I find myself more focused on the things I don't have but wish I did.
6 of 48
I am grateful for the things I have been given.
7 of 48
When bad things happen, I feel like I am getting what I deserve.
8 of 48
I think God cares about the details of my life.
9 of 48
I don't believe anyone can ever know what is absolutely true.
10 of 48
I feel strong relationships are hard, but worth it.
11 of 48
I am so busy that I find myself ignoring the most important things in my life.
12 of 48
I believe God is loving and kind.
13 of 48
I am intentionally seeking to grow in my relationships with others.
14 of 48
I find myself drawn to things I know are bad for me.
15 of 48
The possibility of gaining a good friend is worth the risk.
16 of 48
I believe truth is the same for everyone.
17 of 48
I have to guard against judging people when I learn they are dealing with tough circumstances.
18 of 48
My faith practices are more about routine than relationship.
19 of 48
I worry about the problems that the future holds.
20 of 48
I have a hard time trusting people.
21 of 48
It troubles me that God has not answered my prayers.
22 of 48
When I am facing a difficult situation, I feel like I can solve problems on my own.
23 of 48
I question why God allowed certain things to happen in my life.
24 of 48
I have been wronged in the past in a way I cannot get over.
25 of 48
When bad things happen, I wonder if God can make things better.
26 of 48
People who have hurt me in the past cause me to avoid some relationships today.
27 of 48
I look forward to good things in my future.
28 of 48
I believe God wants what is best for me.
29 of 48
I am willing to serve others for nothing in return.
30 of 48
I have witnessed things that make me wonder if God is in control.
31 of 48
I observe things that make me wonder if I should believe the Bible.
32 of 48
I worry that God is angry with me.
33 of 48
I spend too much of my energy pursuing material things.
34 of 48
I believe God is willing and able to answer my prayers.
35 of 48
I feel with God's help, I can face any situation.
36 of 48
I tend to expect the worst to happen.
37 of 48
I am willing to sacrifice immediate gratification for something better down the road.
38 of 48
I know a lot of people, but don't feel very close to many people.
39 of 48
I have too many of my own problems to deal with the problems of others.
40 of 48
I am amazed at God's power.
41 of 48
I believe the Bible has answers for today's circumstances.
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I believe God loves me in spite of who I am.
43 of 48
People would describe me as a giving person.
44 of 48
It humbles me to think I can know God.
45 of 48
I try to avoid temptations that would bring me harm.
46 of 48
I feel there is a disconnect between who I really am and how I act in front of other people.
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I feel I can turn to God for direction.
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I believe in an all-powerful, all-knowing God.
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